hookslovelyswan
Potter has done too much for me for me to ever want to shit all over it. I’m never going to say: ‘Don’t ask me questions about that’. I remember reading an interview with Robert Smith from The Cure. Somebody said to him: ‘Why do you still wear all that makeup, don’t you feel a bit past it?’ And he said: ‘There are still 14-year-olds coming to see The Cure for the first time, dressed like that. I’d never want to make them feel silly.’ It’s a similar thing with Potter. People are still discovering those books and films. It would be awful for them to find out the people involved had turned their backs on it. Though sometimes, people do come up and say ‘I loved you in The Woman in Black,’ which is really sweet. That’s them knowing that it matters to me that I’ve done other stuff.
starksexual

Feminism has fought no wars. It has killed no opponents. It has set up no concentration camps, starved no enemies, practised no cruelties.

Its battles have been for education, for the vote, for better working conditions…for safety on the streets…for child care, for social welfare…for rape crisis centres, women’s refuges, reforms in the law.

If someone says, “Oh, I’m not a feminist,” I ask, “Why, what’s your problem?”

Dale Spencer (via fawun)
hummingbirds-and-champagne

allinablur:

Because it’s been 238 years since Jane Austen was born, let’s celebrate it with some snarky, witty Jane (from 22 years until 41):

Next week I shall begin my operations on my hat, on which you know my principal hopes of happiness depend. Letter (1798-10-27)

I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal. Letter to Cassandra (1798-12-24)

I had a very pleasant evening, however, though you will probably find out that there was no particular reason for it; but I do not think it worth while to wait for enjoyment until there is some real opportunity for it. Letter (1799-01-21)

She would tell you herself that she has a very dreadful cold in her head at present; but I have not much compassion for colds in the head without fever or sore throat. Letter to Cassandra (1799-01-21)

I cannot help thinking that it is more natural to have flowers grow out of the head than fruit. Letter to Cassandra (1799-06-11) on decorating her hat

I can recollect nothing more to say at present; perhaps breakfast may assist my ideas. I was deceived — my breakfast supplied only two ideas — that the rolls were good and the butter bad. Letter (1799-06-19)

I believe I drank too much wine last night at Hurstbourne; I know not how else to account for the shaking of my hand today. You will kindly make allowance therefore for any indistinctness of writing, by attributing it to this venial error. Letter to Cassandra (1800-11-20)

We are to have a tiny party here tonight. I hate tiny parties, they force one into constant exertion. Letter (1801-05-21)

The pleasures of friendship, of unreserved conversation, of similarity of taste and opinions will make good amends for orange wine. Letter to Cassandra (1808-06-20)

I am sorry to tell you that I am getting very extravagant, and spending all my money, and, what is worse for you, I have been spending yours too. Letter to Cassandra (1811-04-18)

How horrible it is to have so many people killed! And what a blessing that one cares for none of them! Letter (1811-05-31) referring to the Peninsular War

I will not say that your mulberry-trees are dead, but I am afraid they are not alive. Letter to Cassandra (1811-05-31)

By the bye, as I must leave off being young, I find many douceurs in being a sort of chaperon, for I am put on the sofa near the fire and can drink as much wine as I like. Letter (1813-11-06) on ageing

I cannot help hoping that many will feel themselves obliged to buy it. I shall not mind imagining it a disagreeable duty to them, so as they do it. Letter (1813-11-06) on the reprint of Sense and Sensibility

There are such beings in the world — perhaps one in a thousand — as the creature you and I should think perfection; where grace and spirit are united to worth, where the manners are equal to the heart and understanding; but such a person may not come in your way, or, if he does, he may not be the eldest son of a man of fortune, the near relation of your particular friend, and belonging to your own county. Letter to Fanny Knight (1814-11-18) on finding love

He and I should not in the least agree, of course, in our ideas of novels and heroines. Pictures of perfection, as you know, make me sick and wicked; but there is some very good sense in what he says, and I particularly respect him for wishing to think well of all young ladies; it shows an amiable and a delicate mind. And he deserves better treatment than to be obliged to read any more of my works. Letter to Fanny Knight (1816-03-23)

I could no more write a romance than an epic poem. I could not sit seriously down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life; and if it were indispensable for me to keep it up and never relax into laughing at myself or other people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the first chapter. No, I must keep to my own style and go on in my own way; and though I may never succeed again in that, I am convinced that I should totally fail in any other. Letter to Mr. Clarke (1816-04-01)

We saw a countless number of post-chaises full of boys pass by yesterday morning — full of future heroes, legislators, fools, and villains. You have never thanked me for my last letter, which went by the cheese. I cannot bear not to be thanked. Letter to J. Edward Austen (1816-07-09)

I would recommend to her and Mr. D. the simple regimen of separate rooms. Letter (1817-02-20) on Mrs. Deedes having an eighteenth child

[all these quotes belong to Letters of Jane Austen - Brabourne Edition // copy & paste from Wikiquote] 

thefictionaffair

314eater:

prevalere:

you know how in some movies the bride/groom calls off the wedding to be with the person they truly love and then they live happily ever after well it’s pretty shitty that the person they were getting married to doesn’t actually get a happy ending but no one seems to care about it to the point that he/she is not even mentioned afterwards as if that person didn’t exist or had feelings at all yeah just a thought

Lord farquaad will be okay

stupidsuburbanalison
stormbornvalkyrie:

What superhero would you choose to be?
Maslany: Raphael the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle for the accent 
Paulson: Wolverine (“I look like that in the morning”) 
Williams: Spider-Man, for the agility and subtlety 
Sagal: Caesar from the Planet of the Apes reboot 
Dormer: Batman, for the psychology 
Beharie: The Hulk, so it’d be on if people pushed the wrong button

stormbornvalkyrie:

What superhero would you choose to be?

Maslany: Raphael the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle for the accent

Paulson: Wolverine (“I look like that in the morning”)

Williams: Spider-Man, for the agility and subtlety

Sagal: Caesar from the Planet of the Apes reboot

Dormer: Batman, for the psychology

Beharie: The Hulk, so it’d be on if people pushed the wrong button